Summary of social work graduate programs prepared by Melissa C.F. Becker, MSW, September 2000
Return to the table of contents to see the other material.

Foundation Practice Sequences

 

University of California–Los Angeles

Methods of Social Welfare Practice sequence: This sequence, which extends over both years of study, provides the theory and techniques for both "micro" and macro practice that undergird the student’s field placement. Indeed, the student should have many opportunities to apply in the field placement what is taught in the classroom. During the first year, students take parallel social welfare methods courses in both micro and macro practice. In the second year, a student is required to take only one methods course each quarter (some take extra as electives). These second year advanced practice methods courses reflect a student’s methods concentration (either micro or macro). Because of the increased intensity of the subject matter and content of the courses, second-year methods courses are worth twice as many credits as first-year methods courses. 

223. Seminar: Social Work Profession: Nature and role of social work in contemporary society; relationships with other professions; probable future trends in the profession; social work ethics, professional organizations, certification licensing; professional responsibility for continued self-criticism and improvement of the profession.

230A-230B-230C. Theory of Social Welfare Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups I, II, III: Introduction to theory of social work with individuals and small groups and to principles of practice which are derivative of this and related theory.

240A-240B-240C. Theory of Social Welfare Practice in Organizations, Communities, and Policy Settings I, II, III: Historical and theoretical developments in administration, planning, and community organization; understanding the community as a social system, administration of organizations; role of the practitioner in identification, analysis, and evaluation of needs, existing programs, policies, structures, and strategies of intervention.

 

 

Fordham University

6320. Generalist Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities:

First in the three course generalist social work practice sequence, this course examines the client's experience of social work services and the social agency as the arena for practice. The course provides a overview of the values, ethics and knowledge base of generalist social work practice. It uses the generic assessment-planning-intervention-evaluation paradigm to focus on social work practice with organizations and communities as settings for practice and as client systems themselves. Particular emphasis is placed on work with task groups and advocacy.

6321. Generalist Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups I: This second course in the generalist social work practice sequence covers the initial phase of the helping process with individuals and families and the middle phase with individuals. It focuses on building generalist practice skills in communication, interviewing, engagement, individual and family assessment, intervention planning, contracting and case documentation. Concurrent field practice required; reduced field instruction students exempted from concurrent field requirement.

6322. Generalist Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups II: The third course of the generalist practice sequence continues to build skills of generalist practice, attending in greater detail to the processes of intervention, evaluation and termination. Particular attention is paid to the beginning and middle phases of work with families and groups, and the necessary tasks and skills involved in endings and transition for all system levels-including the evaluation of practice. Skills involved in case management are addressed. Prerequisite: SWGS 6321; concurrent field practice required; reduced field instruction students are exempt from concurrent field requirement.

 

Virginia Commonwealth University

604. Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups I: Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre or corequisite: SLW 601. The first of two foundation courses on social work practice with individuals, families, and groups. Defines and describes the history, context, phases and processes of direct social work practice. Introduces basic knowledge, skills, and values necessary to provide a range of restorative, rehabilitative, maintenance and enhancement services. Emphasizes the multidimensional context in which intervention occurs. Introduces selected practice theories and models to guide intervention with an emphasis on work with individuals.

605. Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families and Group II: Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SLW 601 and 604. Pre or corequisite: SLW 610. Second of two foundation courses on social work practice with individuals, families, and groups. Extends application of beginning knowledge and skills to the phases of intervention with groups and families. Presents knowledge and skills of environmental intervention and termination. Introduces selected theories and models for social work practice with individuals, families and groups with attention to special population groups.

607. Social Work Practice for Advanced Standing Students: 2 credits. Prerequisite: Admission to the Advanced Standing Program; concurrent enrollment in SLW 608, 611, 612. Reviews approaches, principles, techniques, and phases of micro and macro social work practice. Emphasizes commonalities and differences among practice modalities, including differential exploration, assessment, intervention, and evaluation of outcome.

608. Perspectives on Emotional Disorders for Advanced Standing Students: 2 credits. Prerequisite: Admission to the Advanced Standing Program; concurrent enrollment in SLW 607, 611, 612. Reviews social work perspectives on emotional and interpersonal problems. Emphasizes: the etiology and manifestation of emotional disorders; the current system for classifying these problems; and the impact of social, ethnic/racial, and gender differences on the definition of these problems.

 

 

Georgia State University School of Social Work

SW 7100. Foundations of Community Practice: This course will introduce students to community practice and community partnerships from a social systems perspective. It will present an overview of community practice, through its history, applications, and domains. Several community practice theories will be critically examined. Students will develop an understanding of the mission of social work and issues of economic and social justice in the context of the community.

SW 7400. Social Work Practice in the Community I: SW 7400 and SW 7800 are designed as a continuum. In this course, the student will be introduced to the knowledge, values, and skills that comprise social work practice in the community. Within a social systems perspective, emphasis is on the problem-solving approach which can be applied to work with individuals, families, small groups, and organizations in a community context. The general stages in the process of the helping relationship will be discussed.

SW 7800. Social Work Practice in the Community II: This course is a continuation of SW 7400. Building on the previous content, this course will provide an overview of specific theories of change for individuals and families and applied styles of intervention within the social systems context of the community will be covered. Strategies will be introduced for working with groups to effect an individual’s behavioral change and to promote healthy behaviors.

 

 

University of Toronto Faculty of Social Work

SWK 4103. Elements of Social Work Practice: The Elements of Social Work Practice and the Social Work Practice Laboratory are the two required courses in the first term of our two-year MSW program providing students with basic preparation for professional practice.  These courses are specifically designed to support students' transition to their field practicum experience and other direct practice courses in the program.  These courses provide the foundation for students to acquire the skills to work with clients or client groups. The Elements of Social Work Practice Course will provide the conceptual foundation for social work practice and the Social Work Practice Laboratory will offer experiential learning aimed at developing basic professional competencies.

Students will be in the same section for both the Elements (SWK 4103F) and Lab (SWK 4105F) courses taught by the same instructor(s). The maximum number of students in each section is 16. There are six sections, five of them will focus on direct social work practice, and one on policy/community practice. Students can choose the policy/community section OR a direct practice section (students choosing the direct practice option will be randomly assigned to one of the four sections).

Policy/Community Practice Section:

This section provides an introduction to social work practice from a mezzo/macro framework, that is, to practice at a community and/or policy level, as distinct from working in direct practice context.  The lab offers a hands-on opportunity to utilize practice skills within community/policy settings with some opportunity to address skills that cut across levels of practice.  The `lab' refers to both classroom exercises as wells as actual experience in the world outside.

Direct Practice Sections:

Upon completion of this course students should emerge with:

*?an understanding of the ecological perspective as a framework to guide social work assessment and intervention, together with a critical assessment of its strengths and limitations;

*?a basic understanding of the stages of the social work process, especially assessment, engagement and relationship building;

*?an ability to use theory and research findings to inform practice;

*?a beginning framework for critical analysis of social work practice;

*?an ability to contextualize social work practice with diverse client populations, especially its societal, institutional, personal and value dimensions;

*?an understanding of the professional context of social work practice, including professional ethics and professional behaviour;

*?a conceptual framework that will serve as a foundation for students to move on to specific methods of intervention.

Assignment/Evaluation:

Direct Practice Sections: Assignment, 40%.  Knowledge of Practice Issues; Assessment, 60%.

Policy/Community Section: One major assignment on how a specific agency, program, etc. cope with and respond to the Common Sense Revolution (First-term of the Harris Government) (100% of the grade), due the end of term.

 

SWK 4105. Social Work Practice Laboratory: The Practice Laboratory is a companion course to the Elements of Social Work Practice Course and concepts studied in that course will be grounded in simulations of practice here in the Lab.  This course aims to link and apply theory and research to practice as student’s master generic interviewing skills.  The Lab is also designed to develop professional practice skills, including the skills of critical self-reflection and offering constructive feedback to colleagues.  The Lab is preparatory to the second term Field Practicum and strives to provide students with practice skills which can be transferred into the agency based practice situation.  A positive learning environment based on mutual support and respect will be cultivated.  This is a credit/non-credit course. Students are required to attend all Lab classes.

Policy/Community Practice Section:

This section provides an introduction to social work practice from a mezzo/macro framework, that is, to practice at a community and/or policy level, as distinct from working in direct practice context. The lab offers a hands-on opportunity to utilize practice skills within community/policy settings with some opportunity to address skills that cut across levels of practice.  The `lab' refers to both classroom exercises as wells as actual experience in the world outside.

Direct Practice Sections:

Upon completion of this course students should emerge with: an understanding of the link between theory and social work process, based on the practice concepts presented in the Elements course; the basic communication and interviewing skills needed for professional relationship building and assessment, such as clarification/collaboration, concreteness/focus, and exploration/direction; the beginning skills needed to practice as a professional.

The focus will be on:

*?collaborating with professional colleagues

*?offering constructive feedback to colleagues and field instructors

*?utilizing feedback from colleagues and field instructors

*?reflecting on and integrating professional, cultural, and personal values

*?critically analyzing one's own performance and interviewing skills through tape analysis and in class role plays

*?defining personal strengths identifying professional development needs and ways to meet them

*?presentation skills

*?collaboration with other professionals

*?The ability to critically evaluate their own performance, and to utilize feedback for continual learning and development.

 

Assignment/Evaluation:

This is a credit/non-credit course. Student has to meet ALL the course requirements and complete ALL assignments in order to obtain credit.

Direct Practice Sections: Students are expected to attend all Lab sessions, participate actively, role-play in video-taped sessions, and complete two tape analyses according to prescribe format.

Policy/Community Practice Section: A number of short tasks, assignments, etc., most of which will be reported orally in class.

Students will be in the same section for both Elements (SWK 4103F) and Lab (SWK 4105F) courses taught by the same instructor(s). Maximum number of students in each section is 16.

SWK 4601. Social Work Practice with Individuals: (Required for IFG concentration)

This course provides fundamental preparation for students interested in direct or clinical social work practice. It can be regarded as a continuation of the direct practice sections of the Elements of Social Work Practice and the Social Work Practice Laboratory courses of the first year fall term. Building on the engagement, alliance development and assessment skills students have mastered in the Elements and Laboratory courses, this course introduces students to some of the basic intervention strategies and procedures commonly utilized in clinical social work practice. Since students are starting their fieldwork practicum in the spring term, emphasis will be put on the integration of classroom learning and practicum experience.

Upon completion of this course students should emerge with:

*?An understanding of research-based practice and how it relates to competent and ethical professional practice.

*?An expanded repertoire of clinical intervention procedures/strategies.

*?Ability to critically examine different systems and models of practice, especially with regard to the clients' agenda.

*?Ability to identify essential elements of competent and ethical practice for evaluation and accountability.

*?A conceptual framework to guide their professional practice and to make sense of their own practice experience.

*?An ability to transfer knowledge between conceptual/theoretical learning and direct practice experience.

This course, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for SWK 4610 Advanced Social Work Practice with Couples, SWK 4614 Advanced Social Work Practice with Individuals.

Course Description:

This course is designed to provide fundamental preparation for students in clinical social work practice with individuals.  A focus of the course will be on applying social work theoretical frameworks to assessment and intervention in practice with individuals.  Each theoretical model will be examined from the perspectives of problem definition, intervention strategies and critiques of biases within the models.  The course will cover fundamental and essential concepts and skills in working with a diverse client population.  Concepts to be discussed include therapeutic alliance, transference and counter transference, ethics and the legal context of social work practice.

Assignments:  Two brief assignments will apply concepts and theories discussed in class to clinical interviews.

 

University of Minnesota–Duluth Department of Social Work

SW 8111. Generalist Practice: Micro: Overview of generalist social work practice, ethics, ecological perspective, and problem-solving model. Application to individuals, families, and groups and to diverse populations. Development of counseling skills.

SW 8112. Generalist Practice: Mezzo and Macro: Problem-solving models of engagement, data collection, assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, and termination with communities, task- centered groups, and organizations. Introduction to grant writing. Emphasis on community resource development with diverse populations.

 

 

Boston University School of Social Work

Intro to Clinical Social Work Practice.

Communities & Organizations: Analysis & Intervention.

 

 

Hunter College School of Social Work

SSW 719. Foundations of Social Work Practice: Practice Methods (e.g., casework, group work, community organizing, and administration).

 

 

Temple University School of Social Administration

413. Practice of Social Service Delivery I: Introduction to social work practice with individuals, families, groups and communities, focusing on interpersonal and social change and empowerment processes entailed in an ecological approach to service delivery.

414. Practice of Social Service Delivery II: A continuation of S.A. 413, focusing on refinement of competence in use of self and practice theory in performance of multiple roles and multi-level practice interventions.

 

 

New Mexico State University School of Social Work

MSW 520. Social Work Practice I: An introduction to the generalist practice of social work. Focuses on professional development, data collection, planning, and assessment within a framework of social work values and ethics that strengthens and empowers family systems. Required. Restricted to MSW students.

MSW 521. Social Work Practice II: Continuation of Social Work Practice I, using generalist social work methods, with emphasis on determination of family problems, goal setting, contracting, intervention, and outcome assessment. Required. Prerequisite: MSW 520. Restricted to MSW students.

 

 

 

 

University of Utah Graduate School of Social Work

SOWK 6401. Contexts of Social Work Practice (.5): The historical contexts of social welfare institutions and social work as a profession are presented. Students are introduced to a problem-solving model for resolving ethical and value dilemmas in social work practice. Also the generalist perspective for social work practice, including a framework to apply and integrate knowledge, skills, and values, is presented.

SOWK 6001. Foundation Practice I: Individuals & Groups (3.0): Focus is on theoretical models, values and skills required for practice with individuals and groups. Processes related to relationship building, problem identification, assessment, intervention, group processes, crisis intervention and termination will be covered. The lab component of this course is experiential to facilitate integration and application of course material through skill-building exercises.

SOWK 6002. Foundation Practice II: Practice in Communities (2.0): Introduces students to the nature and scope of generalist community practice in social work. The course will cover the theoretical base of community practice, the historical origins of the commitment of social work to alter societal conditions, models of practice, skills base, and problems and concerns including the disempowering and enriching experiences of minority groups and women. The course will include values, skills and knowledge directed toward the intra personal, and environmental/political aspects of community practice.

SOWK 6003. Foundation Practice III: Couples and Families (3.0): Focuses on agency-based practice with couples and families with diverse life styles: nuclear, divorcing, bi-nuclear, reconstituted, non-traditional. Issues related to substance abuse, family violence, and poverty will be covered. The lab component of this course is experiential to facilitate integration and application of course material through skill building exercises.

SOWK 6004. Foundation Practice IV: Practice in Organizations (2.0): This course will focus on social workers as organizational participants and leaders and introduce content on the nature of the supervisory role in social work practice. Content will include the unique aspect of human service organizations, the array of administrative and supervisory theories, power and control issues in organizations, diversity and discrimination in human services organization. The skills base in social work administration and supervision will be emphasized.

 

 

Gallaudet University Department of Social Work

SWK 741. Social Work Practice I (4): This is the first foundation course in the sequence of social work practice courses. It focuses on the knowledge, values, and skills required to intervene with individual, family, and group systems. This course focuses on social work relationships as an integral component for change. Students will gain knowledge and skill in the use of self in social work practice. 

SWK 742. Social Work Practice II (3): This is the second foundation course in the sequence of social work practice courses. It focuses on the knowledge, values, and skills required for effective intervention with larger systems of organizations and communities. It builds upon knowledge of interventions with individuals and groups to develop foundation skills such as advocating for clients within complex systems, building coalitions, negotiating with diverse groups, assessing community needs, program evaluation, development, management, proposal writing, understanding budgets, and supervision. 

Portland State University Graduate School of Social Work

SW 530. Generalist Social Work Practice I (4 credit hours): Overview of the major influences on the service delivery system with special emphasis on the multiple roles of the generalist social worker, social work values, and ethics. Development of interviewing skills with focus on engagement, development of rapport, definition of purpose, and advocacy.

Introduction to theory and the change process at five levels of social work practice: individual, family, group, organization, and the community. Special attention to the issues of cultural diversity and populations at risk. Based on the strengths and ecological systems perspectives. Corequisite: SW 500.

SW 531. Generalist Social Work Practice II (4 credit hours): Based on the generalist social work practice principles, assessment and goal formulation aspects of the change process emphasized at multiple levels: individual, family, group, organization, and community. Family-centered approach is focused upon. Development of interviewing skills related to assessment with cultural considerations. Collaboration and team work examined. Introduction to evaluation. Application of strengths and ecological systems perspectives to assessment. Prerequisite: SW 530 / Corequisite: SW 500.

SW 532. Generalist Social Work Practice III (4 credit hours): Based on the generalist social work practice model, intervention and evaluation at multiple levels: individual, family, group, organization, and community. Family-centered approach with emphasis on strategies of promoting empowerment, equity and social justice. Development of interviewing skills for intervention and role disengagement. Examination of the entire change process with focus on evaluation strategies and technologies. Prerequisite: SW 531 / Corequisite: SW 500.

 

George Warren Brown, Washington University in St. Louis

Foundations of Social Work Practice I & II.

 

 

Columbia University

T7100. Foundations of Social Work Practice: Designed to provide students with competence in: the practice foundation of social work methods and processes applied to differing levels, units, characteristics, and properties of social systems required for advanced concentration; knowledge of the multiple frames of reference that reflect the organization and diversity of the profession in providing services; and social work values and their ethical implications.

T7102. Direct Practice: Prerequisite: T7100. Students learn about the ongoing helping process, with a particular emphasis on the relationship between assessment and intervention. Emphasis on dimensions of time (crisis, short term, and long term services); problems-in-living (life-transitional, environmental, and interpersonal stresses); modalities (individuals, families, groups, and environment); termination (referral, transfer, and ending); and skills in the systematic evaluation of practice.

T7103. Advocacy in Social Work Practice: Case and Cause: Prerequisites: T7100 & T6801. Students develop their capacity: 1) to assess the organizations, communities, and social policies that affect their clients’ daily lives and opportunities; and 2) to differentially intervene to influence organizations, communities, and social policies in the pursuit of effective social service delivery and social and economic justice.

SSA University of Chicago

301. Social Intervention: Direct Practice I, II: This course introduces students to the fundamental values and conceptual bases of social intervention. It is designed to teach the knowledge and skills necessary to enable students to carry out activities that will enhance the lives of people with psychosocial needs and problems. Content is structured around professional socialization, context for practice, diversity, assessment, intervention, and evaluation. Emphasis is on developing skills for intervention with individuals, families, and groups. The task-centered approach forms the framework for practice. Various theories and models of practice are examined for an understanding of similarities and differences in their approaches to problem-solving. The course aims for an integration of theory and practice that will enable students to effectively intervene on behalf of their clients. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the assessment of problems and a beginning competence in the processes of change.

Field Work: All students will have supervised experiences in social service agencies. These field placements afford an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills from the intervention course. Students engage in direct intervention with individuals, families, or small groups and have opportunities to explore intervention at other system levels within the agency and community context.

Skills Laboratory: A required skills training laboratory is conducted concurrent with the course work in 301 during autumn quarter. The laboratory provides an opportunity for students to develop skills implementing the theoretical material covered in 301. Emphasis is placed on interviewing skills, assessment skills, and techniques for intervention. Throughout the lab, particular attention is paid to implementing of concepts related to values and ethics, diversity, and worker’s use of self.

 

 

Case Western Reserve University

SSWM 400. Social Work Methods.

 

 

University of Southern California

543. Social Work Practice I: Theory and principle underlying generic social work practice with primary emphasis on working with individuals.

545. Social Work Practice II: Theories and principles of generic social work practice with primary emphasis on families, groups, and communities. Prerequisite: 503 (HBSE), 533 (policy), and 543 (practice I).

 

 

University of Texas–Austin

383R. Social Work Methods I: Introduction to social work practice methodology and the professional use of self in a generalist practice with individuals and groups, within the context of organizations and communities.

383S. Social Work Methods II: Builds on Methods I by deepening students’ knowledge of generalist practice and introduces other practice approaches used with individuals, families, and groups, within the context of organizations and communities.

 

University of Pennsylvania

604. Foundations of Social Work Practice: This is the first of a four-course sequence designed to assist the student in developing a knowing, professional use of self in offering social work services to individuals, groups, families, and communities. It integrates the student’s theoretical learning with the experience in the field placement agency. The student is introduced to a holistic process-oriented approach to social work practice, and to the methods to be used for their implementation. The course emphasizes the social context for practice with special attention to agency purpose, functions and structure; the client system and its perceptions of need; goals and resources; and the social worker as a facilitator of change.

614. Social Work Practice: This is the second in a four-course sequence and continues the examination and use of practice frameworks and methods for service delivery in working with individuals, groups, families and communities. It emphasizes the eradication of institutional racism and other forms of oppression along with the integration of an ethnic-sensitive approach to social work practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities. Attention is given to understanding client problems in relation to different approaches to social work practice and service requirements and the ability to use professional values to guide and inform practice.

 

 

University of Michigan

SW 516 (792). Foundation Skills for Social Work Practice: This course will present the foundation skills that all social workers need in order to practice in interpersonal, organizational, community, policy, and evaluation settings. Students will learn that social workers act as group facilitators, mediators, counselors, brokers, advocates, administrators, organizers, planners, and so forth. These roles must be based, not only on an understanding of cause and effect, but also on adherence to social work values and ethics. Performing these roles effectively requires knowledge of one’s cultural characteristics and other social identities, how one is perceived and reacted to by others, and one’s professional and personal strengths and limitations. In all settings, social workers must develop relationships with clients, colleagues, supervisors, other professionals, and many other constituencies that make up the organizations in which they work. In all of these contexts of employment, social workers are expected to understand patterns of functioning, to assess strengths and limitations, and to plan and implement change strategies. Social work practice further requires that social workers evaluate methods of change, not only on the basis of situational effectiveness, but also on whether their implementation enhances the client’s capacity for self-determination and the system’s capacity for social justice.

 

 

Howard University School of Social Work

Social Work Practice & Processes (all students).

Direct Services Assessment (for direct services majors only).

Macro Social Work Practice (for social service management & community organization majors only).

 

 

University of California–Berkeley

240. Introduction to the Field of Social Welfare and the Profession of Social Work: Course examines the history, development, and mission of the field and profession; fundamental social work tasks; and the organizational contexts of practice.

241. Foundation of Social Work Practice: Introduction to the fundamental values, knowledge, processes, and skills of social work.

 

 

University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill

224. Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities: This course engages students in an exploration and validation of those processes, principles, and technologies involved in helping work groups, organizations, and communities.

227. Social Work Practice with Individuals: This course provides the foundation for social work practice with individuals within the context of social welfare organizations. It emphasizes basic knowledge, analytic and practice skills, and values necessary for practice.

228. Social Work Practice with Groups: Course designed to enable students to become more knowledgeable and skillful as social group workers. Phases of group development and worker tasks in each phase provide the course framework.

 

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison

440. Theory and Practice of Social Work I.

458. Interpersonal Skills Development for Social Workers: Basic interpersonal skills focusing on interpersonal communications, conscious use of self, and development of interviewing and group leadership skills. Lab with emphasis on individual participation and practicing new behaviors and skills. Use of videotape.

Students must also complete one of the following:

622. Social Work with the Person: Use of knowledge and interpersonal skills to assist people in using personal and social resources for problem solving.

?-or-

623. Social Work with the Family: Social work intervention in family problems within the social context, focusing on social work treatment aimed at the restoration of social functioning within the family unit.

?-or-

624. Social Work with the Small Group: Exploration of the small group as the interventive unit; major models and techniques; principles guiding the selection of the small group approach to intervention based on research knowledge of problems, processes, and outcomes.

?-or-

626. Social Work with the Community: Community relationships in public and voluntary social services; principles of community organization and social welfare administration.

?-or-

627. Affecting Change in Social Agencies: Professional Foundation Direct Practice Methods course addressing the contributions a front line social worker can make to positive change efforts in social welfare/social service agencies.

 

 

Smith College School for Social Work

101/102. Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families: This course will address the fundamental purposes, functions, and methods of social work practice with individuals and with families. The historical development of social work will be explored as it provides a basis for understanding the current context of practice. The course will focus on learning the skills of psychological assessment from psychodynamic, family, and social contextual theoretical perspectives. It will also focus on acquiring practice intervention skills, including attention to: the stages of intervention; the use of self in helping relationships; modifications in approaches based on cultural variation and experience of social oppression; selection of most relevant interventive modality; and agency-based considerations affecting practice, including the use of supervision. The role of research in advancing social work theory and practice will also be addressed.

301/302. Clinical Social Work Practice: This course builds upon the academic and clinical foundations of the Introductory Practice course and the first year field placement and develops more intensively and precisely the biopsychosocial framework for assessment and intervention. Students will learn to assess clients’ functioning using psychodynamic developmental models, descriptive diagnosis and social theories which explore the fit between person and environment. The course will focus primarily on clinical interventions with individual adult clients. Students will examine the practice implications of different theoretical frameworks with particular attention to the usefulness of these theory and practice models with populations at risk. In addition, critical aspects of the therapeutic relationship which promote growth and change, the application of social work values and evaluation of practice are areas of focus.

190. Group Theory and Practice (PRAC/HBSE): This course introduces students to the history of social group work and focuses on applying the values, skills, and knowledge of the social work profession to a variety of groups. Theoretical and practical principles of group work are introduced to enhance understanding and use of group as a complex system of roles and interrelationships. Students learn how to construct task and treatment groups and how to mobilize the resources of existing groups. Primary focus is given to those dynamics which are common to all groups, and students will begin to explore how issues of difference (gender, race, sexual orientation, age, culture, class, ability, religion) affect group processes.

191. The Social Worker as Change Agent in the Agency and the Community: Theory and Practice (PRAC/HBSE): This course will introduce students to the macro practice of community work with emphasis on organizing and advocacy skills needed to implement organizational and community change. The course will build on knowledge of groups to bridge the expedience between micro and macro practice. Topics for discussion include the empowering experiences for clients as well as the role of the social worker in that process. In addition, we will explore the process of change in social agencies and the skills needed to initiate that process. Students will be introduced to the Community Project assignment and begin to integrate course concepts with Project initiatives.


Return to the table of contents to access the other material.

You can email Melissa: socialwork@fullerbecker.com

fullerbecker.com - online since April 1999
This page posted September 23, 2000